Nokia's "Comes with Music" DRM cracked

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nokia-comes-with-drm.jpgRejoice, those of you with a “Comes with Music” subscription. You’ll now be able to strip the DRM off the tracks that, remember, you’ve paid for – and use them whenever and wherever you like. In all honesty, I’m surprised it took this long.

The software you’ll need is Tunebite. It costs £17.50 (or free, see below), and works by playing back the song at a very high speed, and then copying the data that comes out onto an MP3 file. It’s a bit like holding up a tape recorder next to your speakers, but retaining all the quality of the original file.

It’ll run at up to 54x speed, meaning that a 4 minute song will take less than five seconds to encode. Of course, running it through a collection of thousands of songs will take a little longer, and you can bet that Nokia will now be keeping an eye out for people

The funniest thing of all? You don’t need to pay for Tunebite either. Go download it on Bittorrent here. Tunebite is making money from assisting piracy, so why shouldn’t you pirate their work, too?

Do me a favour, though – if you find a band that you love through this, then go see them on tour, or buy a tshirt, or something. Those are things that’ll genuinely benefit the band, and reward them directly for their work without your money going through umpteen other companies, each taking a share.

Get Tunebite (via Electric Pig)

Related posts: The lowdown on Comes with Music – not unlimited, comes with DRM | Comes with Music comes to 3 on the Nokia N95

Duncan Geere

37 comments

  • It'll run at up to 54x speed, meaning that a 4 minute song will takeless than five seconds to encode. Of course, running it through acollection of thousands of songs will take a little longer, and you canbet that Nokia will now be keeping an eye out for people

    The funniest thing of all? You don't need to pay for Tunebite either. Go download it on Bittorrent here. Tunebite is making money from assisting piracy, so why shouldn't you pirate their work, too? 

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  • Hi everyone. What´s up folks?! Tunebite is known since 2004 in the web and I guess you can buy in some countries in a box on a shelf in the stores. There is nothing knew about it. Tunebite works with 54x speed and with so called 100% perfect audio quality to produce private copies. No Crack. No Hack and no piracy. It total legal and several times awarded. So come down. Everything ok. 🙂

  • Duncan–I think it’s a bit sad that as someone who obviously makes his living off of his intellectual property doesn’t take piracy more seriously. Some people no matter how much they love a song, are not going to go out and buy additional merchandise, thus treating a song as a loss leader for the hope of gaining revenue elsewhere ends up no where. Not sure why people who claim to be such fans cannot just PAY the 99 pence to get a song. We’re not talking about loads of money here. Anyway, Nokia CWM is a bad model for artists IMO, it just encourages people to think music should be FREE, when rightly pointed out by Stuart, they are really just renting it out. Might help with phone sales tho.

    • I started typing a reply to this, but it started getting rather long, so I’m going to spin it off into an editorial called “Why I advocate piracy”. Keep an eye out for that. In the meantime, very briefly:

      A percentage of people who experience your content will pay for stuff associated with it. By issuing that content free, you’re maximising the number that you’re taking that percentage of. “Why should I have to pay 99p before I find out whether I like something or not?”, says the consumer on the street.

      Music should be free because people are already used to getting it free. Radio, hearing it in clubs, TV shows, etc etc – even before the internet came along, the vast majority of people got their music for free. P2P, and music-sharing is simply the continuation of that.

      Lastly, with regards to me making my money off my intellectual property, how much are you paying to read this blog post?

  • >> it means that the person who’s listening to you can listen to you a hell of a lot more, and you get paid the same anyway. How is that a bad thing? <<

    Duncan – Sorry, it’s not that simple. I don’t know the details of the Comes With Music business model, but similar concepts (i.e. Napster Subscription) include payment of royalties to the rights owners calculated on “plays” (per play or pro-rated). IMHO, if you tunebite a track, you simply take it out of the revenue stream. How is that a good thing?

    • I’m not privileged enough to know the details of the royalty system either, but you could call it an investment for the future. You’re getting the fan’s attention, rather than Nokia. Someone who can listen to your music whenever and wherever they want is far more valuable to you than someone who can only listen when sat at their PC, or on their phone. For starters, that person is going to have a lot of difficulty telling anyone else about you.

  • No you haven’t paid for the track.
    You’ve just paid for the right to listen to that track on a specific device.
    Subtle difference? Not if you’re a songwriter it isn’t.
    If you rent your house out, the tennant just buys the right to live there for a while. They haven’t paid for the right to take out your furniture and give it away to their mates.

    • At no point did I suggest that you should use this software to send the tracks round to your mates (though I have no issue with that, because those mates might love it, and then go buy CDs, T-shirts, gig tickets etc).

      What I’m saying is that you should use this software to allow you to listen to your tracks on whatever device you want. To a songwriter, it means that the person who’s listening to you can listen to you a hell of a lot more, and you get paid the same anyway. How is that a bad thing?

  • It is digitally playing and then re-recording and encoding the file, so it will definitely be generating a lower quality result than the original file. The only way around this would be for the re-encoding process to use a lossless file format.

    This method of breaking DRM has been around ever since DRM was invented, its just been packaged into a convenient app.

    • I guess the quality reduction depends on the software, but yes – it will make your files doubly ‘lossy’. I strongly suspect that that won’t bother most consumers, however. They’re getting unlimited tracks that they can do what they want with, after all.

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