BT Total Broadband don their detective caps and conclude that OMG MEN SHOP ONLINE!

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menshopping.jpg BT don’t just churn out the nation’s broadband and phone services anymore, oh no, it appears they spend a heck of a lot of time doing HIGHLY IMPORTANT RESEARCH FOR THE NATION’S WELFARE. In other words, they’ve just completed a survey amongst men where the results are rather un-shocking. Turns out men like shopping after all, and that vast chasm of goods otherwise known as THE INTERNET is to blame. Is to blame for them no longer buying us women flowers, I mean, as they’re too busy buying ironic t-shirts on Threadless.

BT Total Broadband has concluded that “the traditional stereotype of men being reluctantly dragged around the shops by their wives and girlfriends has been replaced by a new era dominated by men out-shopping their partners online from the comfort and secrecy of homes and offices across the nation”.

With 72% of men having their arms twisted behind their back when speaking to BT infront of their wives and forced to decrease the alleged amount of time they spend on the net buying clothes, gadgets, and assorted other necessities, BT has dubbed this the ‘Me Moment’.

Apparently using the internet to do things other than – gasp! – work and email, such as shop and, err, FaceBook, is proving very attractive for men, with 25% of you between the ages of 16-35 claiming it’s to “escape the world of work”, and 40% claiming it was “a way of getting away from their everyday life”, a metaphor for ‘getting away from the missus and her constant bitching about my toenail clippings on the shag pile’.

It seems that the men surveyed were a wiley bunch, however, as 63% of the sneaky blokes claimed they used the majority of their internet usage for booking trips and holidays for the family, and for “healthcare support, maps and directions”.

If that’s what the new code-word for porn is these days, then.

BT Total Broadband

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Katherine Hannaford