Nokia E5 Symbian S60 handset revealed

Rounding off the set of new handsets revealed today by Nokia at their Everyone Connect event is the Nokia E5. Cheap as chips at an expected £160, the Nokia E5 is far smarter than the budget price tag should allow…

Nokia C3 budget QWERTY smartphone announced

Nokia have announced the launch of the C3 at this morning's Everyone Connect event. Featuring a full QWERTY keypad, it's a Symbian S40-running budget smartphone. Okay, so Symbian S40 isn't the most exciting OS it could be running (it's…

Nokia unveil the C6 messaging phone

Nokia have revealed their C6 messaging phone at this morning's Everyone Connect event. It may not be the Nokia N8 Symbian ^3 handset that many believed yesterday's cryptic countdown would unveil, but this QWERTY slider will certainly be worth a…

Nokia Nautilus and two other touchscreen mobiles to come

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The word on The Street is that Nokia is getting serious about touchscreen mobiles since RIM took a bite out of their market share last year and, apparently, we’re to see three new models in the next 12 months.

One is 4.2″ tablet type handheld with a “hidden slide-out QWERTY” due to hit the shelves before Christmas. A second is known for now as “Nautilus” and has the kind of talk around it that makes it sound like something from the year 2116. It’s supposed to be a much finer form and with an ultra-thin QWERTY that slides out by means of a sensor with keys that raise for easier typing.

Sounds slightly farcical but I’m happy to run with it until I hear otherwise. Funnily enough, Nautilus isn’t expected for a year. The third touchscreen handset is thought to be with us within four months, though.

No word on the on the OS of the handsets but I wouldn’t presume S60 to be the natural choice. I have it on good authority that the next big handset from Nokia after the N97 will run Linux.

Samsung to launch app store at MWC 2009

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Samsung will be announcing its very own app store at MWC. I’m sure I was saying something about the importance of this kind of thing just a few hours ago?

It’ll provide programs for phones on the S60 and Windows Mobile platforms when it launches with 1,100 applications…

Look who's stalking: FindMe now supports s60 Nokias.

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Facebook stalkers everywhere will be delighted to learn that Electric Pocket has finally got around to releasing a client for FindMe, the Facebook stalking geo-location application, for s60 mobile phones (ie: most high-end Nokias).

FindMe has been available for Windows Mobile and Blackberry devices for ages, and can be used to “tag” locations (“home”, “work”, etc) and automatically update your Facebook profile with your location. Somewhat uniquely, it doesn’t require your phone to have GPS to function – it works out your position based on nearby mobile phone masts alone. Whilst this is perhaps slightly less accurate than GPS, it does mean that more phones are compatible…

S60 Summit 2008: Experience

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0818: The second day of the S60 Summit kicks off with Esa Eerola, who is the Head of S60 User Experience Marketing at Nokia, taking to the stage. He begins the day stating that “total user experience is a result of many factors”, including the software platform (of course), the ability to personalise the device, adding wallpapers, ringtones etc as well as applications and add-ons, and finally, having available form factors, whether that be a candybar, slider, clamshell, or smartphone.

0830: Eerola cries out that new requirements are needed for handsets, improving multitasking, making the navigation nicer to look at, calling upon the use of widgets for easy personalisation, and expanding the way to present system and event based notifications….

Live-blog will be updating continually

Customers didn't embrace video-calling as they're vain, says Nokia (I paraphrased)

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Speaking at the S60 Summit in Barcelona today, Ukko Lappalainen, the VP Category Manager for Nokia’s Nseries, claimed that users “aren’t interested” in video-calling, mainly because they find the angle a handset must be held at for the best quality video-call “isn’t very flattering”.

He went on to say that when people take photos, it’s generally from a higher angle, looking down on the person, as it makes for a better photo, and that the location of a webcam on a laptop or PC monitor is always on the top, for the same reason. Users want to look good when they video-call, which is why the function never really took off when it was introduced to the market in 2005, Lappalainen announced to the 500 or so audience members at the Summit…