The Digest: Sony hack an ‘inside job’… and 3 other things people are talking about today

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Sony hack: New evidence points to inside job, say security experts | The Hollywood Reporter

“Despite the FBI declaring that North Korea was behind the devastating cyber attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment, security experts continue to believe that the hack was an inside job. Security firm Norse claims it has evidence that shows the Sony hack was perpetrated by six individuals, including two based in the US, one in Canada, one in Singapore and one in Thailand.”

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Google to blame for Gmail shutdown, say Chinese state media | The Guardian

“Google’s unwillingness to obey Chinese law is to blame for the shutdown of its hugely popular email service, state-run media have said after the last easy way to access Gmail was apparently blocked. Gmail, the world’s biggest email service, has been largely inaccessible from within China since the runup to the 25th anniversary in June of the Tiananmen Square crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators.”

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Microsoft reportedly replacing Internet Explorer with new Windows 10 browser | Stuff

“Microsoft’s Internet Explorer is no longer the world’s leading web browser, but nearly two decades after its Windows 95 debut, it remains widely in use. However, that could change with Windows 10. Sources claim that Microsoft is working on a brand new web browser for inclusion in next year’s big operating system release. It’s codenamed ‘Spartan’, and contrary to some previous rumours, it won’t just be the next version of Internet Explorer with a new name and look.”

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New Twitter ads make it seem like people follow brands & others, even if they don’t | Marketing Land

“Take a look at your ‘Following’ list on Twitter. You might find some brands or people showing up there, even if you don’t follow them. If so, that seems due to a new change in how Twitter is doing placement for promoted accounts.”

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Stuart O’Connor