Scorsese considering a 3D-only future following critical success of Hugo

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936full-martin-scorsese.jpg3D cinema has many detractors, calling out the discomfort of the glasses and the inflated ticket prices. They once had a high-proflie supporter in the shape of directorial legend Martin Scorsese, who had stated jsut a few short years ago that he had no intention of ever making a 3D film. Now, following the success of his first 3D flick Hugo, Scorsese has admitted to a massive about-turn over the benefits of 3D filming, going so far as to suggest he may never work in 2D again.

“Quite honestly, I would,” said Scorsese when asked by Deadline if he’d consider a 3D only future behind the camera.

“I don’t think there’s a subject matter that can’t absorb 3D; that can’t tolerate the addition of depth as a storytelling technique. We view everyday life with depth.”

So what brought around the change of heart?

“Well, the story of Hugo,” he said. “The climate of what Jim Cameron did with Avatar and 3D seemed right and the subject matter was just perfect for it. And it was time to take a chance with it.”

“(3D) shouldn’t be limited to fantasy or sci-fi. Look at (Werner) Herzog’s use of it (in Cave of Forgotten Dreams), Wim Wenders with Pina.

“It should be considered a serious narrative element and tool, especially when telling a story with depth as narrative.”

Scorsese also talked about how a number of his older classic films like The Aviator and Taxi Driver could have benefitted from 3D technology.

“Taxi Driver, because of the intimidation of the main character, his presence is everywhere, a frightening kind of presence.”

Could we see a 3D retro-fitting of Taxi Driver on the cards? With Cameron doing the very same thing with his blockbuster Titanic, anything is possible.

Gerald Lynch