Games consoles bring down Chinese crimelord

The gangster lifestyle makes for good videogame material (take your bow, Grand Theft Auto), but the criminal world and gaming dont appear to best friends when it comes to the real world. Take the case of Rai Kinzan, the 37…

Fraud on iTunes leads to app developer ban

If you're into buying ebooks on the App Store to read on your Apple gadgets, you may well have noticed that developer Thuat Nguyen has held 42 of the top 50 book app positions on the platform for some time….

UK businesses at threat from "evolved" cyber criminal attacks

The CA Internet Security Business Unit have released their latest State of Internet security report, revealing that rogue or fake security software, major search engines, social networks and Web 2.0 threats were the most notable online security issues in 2009….

OPINION: Embrace the spam

spam-email-sample-of-a.jpg

So after yesterday’s rubbish McAfee scare-mongering attempt to get us all to sign up for one of its products, us lot here at Tech Digest thought it might be good to take a look at a sample of genuine spam.

You never know, one of those lottery emails just might be the real deal. And what if, one fortunate evening, you find yourself in the company of a willing lady and could actually really do with some herbal Viagra and a winky that’s five times its original size?

Spam could be a life saver. And if nothing else, it’s always very entertaining…

Don't go to (click on) Hong Kong – one-in-five .hk domain names are scams

mcafee-virusscan-plus-2007-hong-kong-domain0danger.jpg

Fear-spreader and paranoia-monger McAfee has raised panic levels of internet browsers to DEFCON 2 today, with its latest guidance on web sites that will do bad things to your computer when/if you visit them.

And it’s the Hong Kong domains – web sites ending in .hk – that are the biggest causers of trouble. Trouble like having pornography set as your home page, trouble like…

Seattle Spam King faces 26 year sentence

spam-emails.jpgSpam… annoying isn’t it? Not quite as annoying as spending 26 years in the slammer though I’ll bet. That’s what Seattle man Robert Soloway, 28, faces after pleading guilty to electronic mail fraud, ordinary mail fraud, and not filing a tax return three years ago. The latter part doesn’t seem so exciting but this was believed to be when Soloway made over $300,000 from his nefarious internet practices.

Limewire fraudster arrested for massive online thievery

limewire.pngThat’s an official offence in the UK, y’know: ‘Massive Online Thievery’. Well, it should be. Usually it’s the sort of phrase used by the music industry to describe what happens on P2P file-sharing services like Limewire, but in this case, I’m talking about a bloke using Limewire to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars from fellow users.