Spotify provide the soundtrack for 2009's Earth Hour

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Want to go greener than the Spotify logo, but missing some symbolism to give your choice meaning? Well, join Spotify and the WWF (the panda people, not the wrestlers) for Earth Hour.

And what is Earth Hour exactly? Well, it’s the WWF’s message to world leaders that people are serious about climate change by encouraging millions of people to turn off their lights at the same time for 60 minutes – on Saturday 28th March at 8:30pm. Spotify’s involvement? An hour long playlist of darkness themed songs to keep spirits up while you keep tripping over bits of cabling.

Nintendo issues sniffy response to Greenpeace's environmental criticism

Every year or so, eco-terrorists Greenpeace compile a report on which technology companies are friendliest to the environment and which really aren’t. Nintendo and Apple routinely score very low, and Nokia routinely scores well, but this year, Nintendo has issued a wonderfully haughty response:

“Nintendo has not been badly rated by Greenpeace. Greenpeace chose to conduct a survey which graded companies based on the voluntary submission of information. Nintendo decided not to take part in the survey and were therefore ‘ungraded’.

“Nintendo provides detailed information regarding its compliance to environmental laws and directives via the Consumer Information section of the Nintendo website and therefore felt it unnecessary to take part in the Greenpeace survey.”

So there you go. Nintendo isn’t environmentally unfriendly, it just doesn’t want to play nice with Greenpeace. In all honesty, I’m not sure I blame them.

Greenpeace Report (via TechRadar)

Related posts: New MacBooks to contain LED backlit screens, boost Greenpeace’s opinion on Apple | Greenpeace accuses Nintendo of not playing eco-friendly ball, in Greener Guide to Electronics report

Energy & Efficiency, episode 10

By simply making a few changes to how we live our daily lives, it’s possible to save energy – and therefore also money and the world.

In a system I’m calling the Modern Energy Efficient Lifestyle (2.0) I shall outline two simple techniques designed to get mankind more in synch with the planet and therefore assure the survival of both man and environment. Here’s how.

To summarise – go to bed at 4.30pm tonight…

Amazon offers 'frustration-free' packaging on top products

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We’ve all been there – that headphone cable that takes two pairs of scissors, a kitchen knife and a bulldog clip to get out of its packet, but still manages to nearly take off your finger. Well, if Amazon gets its way, that experience will be no more – it’s announced a ‘frustration-free packaging’ and launches today on 19 of Amazon’s best-selling products.

The goal is to make it easier for customers to get to the stuff they’ve paid for, and it also has the side-benefit of reducing use of plastic, which sticks about for bazillions of years once discarded. Amazon are initially focusing on two things – the aforementioned plastic bubble clamshells and those with plastic-coated wires tying them in place…

Carbon Hero – track your carbon footprint on your phone, no guitars in sight

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Carbon footprints are difficult. They’ve received a lot of attention in the press, and they’re firmly stamped (no pun intended) on the public psyche, but they’re not actually very accurate. Given the complexity of power generation in modern life, it’s something that’s incredibly difficult to calculate, and very easy to underestimate.

This device, the Carbon Hero, was designed by an art graduate named Andreas Zachariah. It tracks your phone signal, and if you’re moving at train-ish speed, on a train track, then it assumes you’re on a train, works out the distance you travel, and gives you a number for your carbon footprint. Simple, right? Well, there’s about a billion things wrong with the idea…

Samsung push their green credentials with the E200 Eco

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Samsung have announced that they’re going a bit green – and have illustrated this in as literal way as possible by actually colouring the phone a lovely shade of green.

The E200 Eco is going to be revised version of the E200 and will obviously contain more environmental friendliness than it’s predecessor. Apparently it’s cased in “bio-plastic”, which is made from corn and apparently emmits 2.16 less tons of carbon dioxide during the manufacturing process when compared to regular plastic. The phone will also be sold in a recycled paper box…