The Digest: Zuckerberg’s resolutions… and 3 other things people are talking about today

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mark-zuckerberg-facebook
Mark Zuckerberg asks Facebook users to suggest his personal challenge for 2015 | The Guardian

“Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg sets himself a personal challenge every year, from wearing a tie every day in 2009 and learning to speak Mandarin in 2010 to only eating meat in 2011 if he killed the animal himself. Now Zuckerberg is turning to Facebook’s 1.35 billion users for ideas for his challenge in 2015.”

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person-using-computer
Tor’s most visited hidden sites host child abuse images | BBC News

“Most traffic to sites hidden on the Tor network go to those dealing in images of child sexual abuse a study suggests. The six-month study sought to catalogue hidden services on the so-called dark net and work out which were the most popular. It found lots of sites peddling illegal drugs but the most popular were those involved with abuse.”

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theinterview
The Interview: South Korea fans risk downloading malware | The Guardian

“Controversial film The Interview has earned $18m so far from online sales and cinema viewings in the US, but some people in South Korea trying to download a pirated version are catching a nasty dose of mobile malware instead. An Android smartphone app in circulation there promises access to a pirated download of the film, but according to security researchers at McAfee, the Technische Universität Darmstadt and the Centre for Advanced Security Research Darmstadt, it’s actually stealing people’s banking details.”

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How the UK coped with the millennium bug 15 years ago | BBC News

“In the final months of 1999 concern grew into panic that the millennium bug was going to cause computers to malfunction and potentially endanger everything from tills to power stations. It didn’t happen quite like that, but the public safety warnings from the time remain intriguing. “

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Stuart O’Connor