The Digest: More trouble for Uber… and 4 other things people are talking about today

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uber-taxi

Sydney siege sees Uber raise prices before backtracking | BBC News

“Cab-ordering firm Uber has been criticised for increasing fares by up to four times normal rates during the hostage crisis in Sydney. As the police cordoned off a wide area around the Lindt cafe where a gunman was holding staff and customers hostage, Uber’s pricing algorithm raised prices as demand spiked.”

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google-spain

Spanish newspapers suddenly regret forcing Google News out of Spain | Business Insider

“Spanish newspapers are now asking Google News not to leave the country. The Spanish Newspapers Publishers’ Association (AEDE) has called on the Spain government and European competition authorities to stop Google shutting its operation down there, the Spain Report says.”

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BT in exclusive talks to buy EE for £12.5bn | The Telegraph

“BT signalled ambitions to dominate the mobile market yesterday when it rejected a cheaper, simpler takeover of O2 to open exclusive talks to buy EE, Britain’s biggest mobile operator, for £12.5bn. It brought down the hammer on a three-week reverse auction in which Telefonica, the owner of O2, was competing against Deutsche Telekom and Orange, the joint owners of EE, to offer BT the most attractive terms.”

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Amazon sellers face financial uncertainty after 1p automated pricing glitch  | The Guardian

“Amazon has come under fire for failing to help the small family-owned businesses that have lost tens of thousands of pounds after a technical glitch caused their products to be sold for a penny. The firm, which had sales of more than $74bn (£48bn) last year, has ignored calls to offer compensation to its selling partners, some of whom have lost up to £100,000 in the week before Christmas.”

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Hacked Sony staff ‘should not worry about studio’s future’ assures CEO Lynton | Computing.co.uk

“Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton has met with company staff to try to allay any fears they might have about the consequences of recent hacker attacks on the company. According to an employee who attended a session, Lynton met Sony workers at a sound stage in Culver City, California, and told them not to worry about the studio’s future following the hack. He also praised them for their work throughout the attacks.”

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Stuart O’Connor