The Digest: Microsoft kills Clip Art… and 4 other things people are talking about today

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Microsoft Office kills Clip Art, replaces it with Bing | PC World

“You’d better enjoy Microsoft’s cheesy Office Clip Art catalog while you can, because it may be going away in favor of Bing. According to a Microsoft support page, the company is retiring its Office Clip website. As an alternative, Microsoft suggests searching on Bing Images for visuals that are free to use under a Creative Commons license. Just look for the ‘license’ button under the search bar, and choose from the ‘free to share’ or ‘public domain’ options.”

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How do Apple, Google and Amazon avoid UK tax? | The Guardian

“Huge US technology companies such as Google, Amazon and Apple sell millions of pounds worth of products and services in the UK – but pay very little tax. How do they get away with it? And can chancellor George Osborne really hope to recoup more in corporation tax from international companies adept at minimising the amount they pay?”

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Twitter expands its anti-troll tools | ABC News

“It’s now easier than ever to banish Twitter trolls. The social network unveiled a mobile friendly suite of tools today that allow users to flag abusive content and users in fewer steps than the previous process.”

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20th Anniversary PS4 announced in original PlayStation colours  | The Verge

“Sony knows that nostalgia is the way to an adult gamer’s heart. In celebration of the PlayStation’s 20th anniversary, the company has announced a commemorative edition of the PS4, one that uses the color palette of the original machine.”

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stephen-hawking

Stephen Hawking warns artificial intelligence could end mankind | The BBC

“Professor Stephen Hawking has said that efforts to create thinking machines pose a threat to our very existence. He told the BBC: ‘The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.’ His warning came in response to a question about a revamp of the technology he uses to communicate, which involves a basic form of AI.”

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Stuart O’Connor