Tim Cook: Android is bigger, but not better than Apple's iPhone and iOS

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Thumbnail image for Tim-Cook-Apple.jpgGoogle’s Android operating system and related products may have the larger sales volume, but Apple CEO Tim Cook doesn’t seem too fussed. Speaking at the annual AllThingsD conference, the head of the Cupertino tech giants affirmed that Apple’s goal has always been to be the best, and not necessarily the biggest manufacturer of tech products in the world, a position he feels the company still maintains.

“For us, winning has never been about building the most,” said Cook.

“Arguably, we make the best PC, but we don’t make the most. Same with the MP3 player. However, with the tablet, we make the best and most. With phones we make the best, but not the most.”

We’re pretty sure Samsung and LG (after the success of the Nexus 4) would have something to say about that smartphone comment.

But it’s not just critic ratings Tim Cook is pleased with, but user engagement too compared to Android rivals:

“We look at usage: what customers are doing. A study said there were twice as many e-commerce transactions on iPad than on all Android devices combined during Black Friday last year.

“What the numbers suggest over and over again are that people are using our products more. My own iPad personal use is a significant percentage of my computing work. It has changed the game. I don’t hear that from Android tablet users.

“Customer satisfaction is sort of the report card no matter the business: iPad and iPhone have the highest customer satisfaction in tablets and phones. We want customers of all ages. We try to appeal to everyone.”

But, arguably still living in the wake of the Steve Jobs-era Apple, Tim Cook has an important few years ahead of him. The strength of his company’s rivals is growing phenomenally, and Cook is yet to deliver a game changing product during his tenure at the top of Apple. Could the iWatch push the Cupertino firm to even greater heights?

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Gerald Lynch