1Gbps broadband hits London with Hyperoptic

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fibre-optic.jpgLondon gets its first 1Gbps broadband service today courtesy of Hyperoptic.

While limited to the small community based in Prices Court in Wandsworth, it’s the first time Brits have had access to such a fast web connection.

And it’s a bargain too. While BT Infinity costs at least £18 a month (not including line rental) for 40Mbps and Virgin’s top package offers 50Mbps for £30 a month, Hyperoptic’s super speeds start at just £12.50 a month, going up to £50 a month not including line rental. For around £60 then, you’re getting the sort of speeds that even those in fibre-optic rich Asian territories dream of.

“We were struck by Hyperoptic’s innovative proposition and could immediately see the benefit a fibre network offers our residents. Firstly, it’s about improving quality of life in terms of having access to the best and fastest technologies rather than struggling with the frustrations of slow connectivity,” said Zair Berry, Director at Prices Court.

“No one else out there can offer us speeds of 1 Gig. Secondly, we want to future-proof our development for existing and prospective tenants, adding the value fibre brings a property. While fibreoptic standards currently allow for 10Gbps bandwidths, this network can accommodate the Internet as it grows and matures. We’re thrilled to be Hyperoptic’s first customer.”

Hyperoptic, run by founding members of Be Broadband, are planning further roll outs across London in 2012, with regions set to benefit including Battersea, the Docklands, Holborn, Shepherds Bush, Vauxhall and Westminster.

Gerald Lynch

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