Belkin N1 Vision router with speed and bandwidth display

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How many times have you found yourself thinking “is my connection running slow?” Well, you’ll know for sure with the Belkin N1 Vision router.

Yes, instead of those pointless flashing lights, we have real information, via a full monochrome LCD display which tracks your upstream / downstream speeds, logs your bandwidth, displays date, time and network access information. And if your connection is unsecured, it’ll tell you who is jumping on it and how much of your bandwidth they are stealing.

It features 802.11n, gigabit ports, a link rate of 300Mbps and a range of up 1,600 ft. In the US, this retails for the equivalent of around £100, a price that will rise considerably if or when it arrives in the UK.

Belkin website

Via Engadget

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Dave Walker

One thought on “Belkin N1 Vision router with speed and bandwidth display

  • I have recently purchased your what is considered the Belkin Flagship Router for the Domestic Market, namely the N1 Vision.

    Although it is aesthetically pleasing to the eye, under the bonnet there are some, what I would call serious shortfalls in the facilities in the software/firmware.

    No Wildcard/Alias tick box in DDNS settings.

    No pick list in the MAC Filter list (Firewall),all addresses have to be entered manually (no good if you have 40 devises attached).

    No pick list in the IP Filter list (Firewall),all addresses have to be entered manually (no good if you have 40 devises attached).

    Devices that have their IP address selected manually appear in the DHCP Client List as Unknown but on the web interface they don’t appear at all.

    Devices that have their IP address selected manually outside of the IP Pool Ending Address appear in the DHCP Client List as Unknown but on the web interface they don’t appear at all.

    There is no facility to rename a device in the DHCP list e.g. from Unknown to IP-Camera

    If the Router has to be restarted it doesn’t update the DHCP Client list until each device is rebooted.

    There is no facility to allocate a devise a fixed IP address, which can be an issue if you have virtual servers setup and the router allocates a different IP address to a devise (which it does from time to time).

    Plus many other shortfalls that you would expect to find in the most basic of routers. All the reviews on this device have concentrated on the eye candy and we all know that beauty is only skin deep!

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