OneWeb bought by UK government and Bharti

Communications company OneWeb has entered into an agreement with a consortium led by HMG  (through the UK Secretary of State for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy) and Bharti Global Limited (“Bharti”) for the acquisition of the OneWeb business. The bid is designed to capitalise the company sufficiently as a going concern to in order to…

#IFA2015 Toshiba introduces Ultra HD 4K convertible and laptop/tablet Satellite Click 10

Amazingly it's been 30 years since Tosh introduced the world's first mass market laptop. Where does the time go? Things have certainly changed a bit since 1985 with this year's IFA in Berlin seeing the Japanese company introducing the world's first 12.5inch Ultra HD 4K convertible, the Satellite Radius 12. Also new to the line…

UK Satellite TV Comparison Guide: Sky versus Freesat

sky-freesat-logos.jpg

Two services that require you to stick a satellite dish to the side of your house.

One has been around for two decades, the other has just celebrated its first birthday.

Both will demand an upfront payment: one will continue to drain money from your bank account each month.

So which is best? Read our comparison guide to see if you should go with coming-of-age Sky or new-kid-on-the-block Freesat.

Read on to find out…

First orbital collision – US and Russian satellites get a little too close

In the first reported orbital collision ever, a US and a Russian communications satellite have accidentally collided 780km above Siberia. A “massive cloud of debris” has been produced, and NASA is tracking the hundreds of bits resulting from the crash, in the hope that they won’t interfere with the ISS and the shuttle, which is due to launch later this month.

It’s comprehensively answered the question of “how much stuff can we stick up there without it hitting each other?”, as 6,000 satellites have been sent into orbit since the first in 1957. Only about half are still in use, with the others having become defunct over the years.

The satellites in question belong to Communications firm Iridium, based in Bethesda, Maryland, and Russia’s civilian space agency, Roscosmos. The former was launched in 1997 and only weighed 560kg, so probably came off rather worse in the collision than its one-tonne Russian rival from 1993.

Place your bets in the comments below as to when the second collision will occur. The closest wins a bit of charred satellite, dug out of the tundra of Siberia.

(via BBC)