Tech Digest daily round up: Can Volvo-owned Polestar take on Tesla?

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By Alexander Migl – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=77194387

On the outskirts of the Swedish city of Gothenburg sits a towering white box with a subtle cross emblazoned on its exterior, writes technology correspondent Michael Cogley in The Telegraph. Nicknamed “the cube”, it is home to Volvo-owned electric car company Polestar – a brand which has up until now been better known for its racing cars than its road vehicles.  In the battle to create the ultimate electric vehicle (EV), Polestar is now taking on Silicon Valley with its latest model, the £49,900 Polestar 2, going head to head with Tesla’s Model 3 and Model S. 

A tiny laser, 100 times brighter than the Sun, could help to treat arthritic knees and prevent the need for joint replacement surgery, claims a story in The Daily Mail. The laser light is inserted into a vein in the arm, where researchers believe it will accelerate blood flow around the body — bringing more nutrients and oxygen to speed up the repair of damaged tissue in worn-out joints, as well as an anti-inflammatory effect. It’s also thought to trigger the release of stem cells, the body’s master cells, which can help form new tissue. The technique is being used in a clinical trial in Taiwan involving 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. 

Shell is trialling large batteries for energy storage at its EV charging forecourts, with the aim of providing ultra-fast EV charging in areas with restricted access to national grids. Implemented in pilot form at Shell’s forecourt in Zaltbommel, the Netherlands, the system comprises a 360kWh on-site battery that stores electricity to increase capacity. This allows drivers to use two 175kW EV chargers simultaneously. Normally, such performance would require a costly grid upgrade, but the presence of an on-site battery avoids this. Autocar

Cybersecurity giant McAfee has announced it is to sell its enterprise business to a consortium led by Symphony Technology Group (STG) for $4 billion (£2.8 billion).  The transaction is expected to close by the end of 2021, subject to customary regulatory approvals and closing conditions. Once complete, the enterprise business will be rebranded, while McAfee will move forward focusing solely on delivering personal security for consumers under the existing brand name, the firm said. Full story on IT Pro. 

Smartphone manufacturer OnePlus has announced a partnership with Hasselblad. The DJI-owned Swedish camera maker has signed onto a three-year partnership with OnePlus. According to a release tied to the news, the pair plan to spend $150 million over the course of the deal, in an attempt to vault OnePlus to the front of the pack. Hasselblad has dipped its toes in the mobile market, including a Moto Z attachment, and has created cameras for DJI drones, but this represents a pretty big move for the 180-year-old camera company. See Tech Crunch.

The European Banking Authority’s email servers have been compromised in a global Microsoft Exchange cyber-attack. The EU body said personal data may have been accessed from its servers. And it had pulled its entire email system offline while it assesses the damage. “The EBA is working to identify what, if any, data was accessed,” it said. Microsoft Exchange servers are widely used for email by major businesses and governments. But few organisations have yet to admit being hit by the attack. See story on the BBC. 

 

Chris Price
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