The Digest: Did North Korea hack Sony? … and 4 other things people are talking about today

Share
[nextpage title=”Next”]

kim-jong-un

New evidence points to North Korean involvement in Sony Pictures hack | The Verge

“As Sony Pictures employees still struggle to get back online, new evidence is emerging that suggests North Korea may be behind the hack. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that researchers investigating the hack have found the malicious code to be almost exactly the same as the code used in a March 2013 attack on a series of South Korean banks and broadcasters, an attack widely believed to have been conducted by North Korea.”

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Next”]

steve-jobs-apple-founder

Steve Jobs to be key witness at Apple iPod trial | The Telegraph

“Former Apple chief executive Steve Jobs, who died in 2011, will give videotaped evidence, as tech giant is accused of inflating the price of iPods.”

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Next”]

sony-playstation-original

20 fascinating facts for PlayStation’s 20th anniversary | The Guardian

“It revolutionalised the games industry and brought us classic titles such as Gran Turismo, Tekken and Resident Evil – and this week the original Sony PlayStation turns 20.”

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Next”]

santa-tracker-2014

Microsoft and NORAD launch 2014 Santa Tracker | SlashGear

“Following closely after Google, NORAD’s 2014 Santa Tracker website is up and running in partnership with Microsoft. As with past years, kids can keep track of Santa’s progress as Christmas nears, and while waiting they can play new games, watch some videos, and more.”

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”Next”]

george-takei

George Takei beams down to Microsoft Research to try out Skype’s real-time Translator | Windows Central

“Skype is one of the most popular forms of communication across mobile platforms and the desktop. Microsoft Research is working on real-time translation functionality to enable consumers to use Skype and engage in conversation with others from around the world. George Takei, better known as Mr Sulu in Star Trek, visited Microsoft Research to see how the technology works.”

[/nextpage]
Stuart O’Connor