Five mega pixels for under £200

Share

Further proof that the price of digital cameras is in freefall was today delivered by Trust, which unveiled a five-mega pixel snapper that will retail for an astonishing £190. That’s around £60 cheaper than its nearest rival Kodak’s Easyshare DX4530. The Trust 910Z Powercam Optical Zoom, not only looks pretty good, in a kind of Olympus mid range model kind of way, it also has a 3x optical and 4xdigital zooms, a 4cm colour TFT monitor and video and webcam facilities.

There’s the usual host of automatic shooting modes, integrated storage of 15MB, plus a SD/MMC card slot and an automatic flash with red-eye control. It almost sounds too good to be true.

More from Trust’s website

(Display Name not set)

3 comments

  • My daughter received a 2mp camera for Christmas and I was wondering about getting one myself.

    I have no idea where to start, but have heard good things about Sony. But the P10 is £340 in electrical retailers, and may be too powerful for what I need, just an occasional holiday or party snap.

    I would like to stay within £250 and still get a decent camera. Any suggestions? How about the Kodak range, it seems reasonably priced.

  • More pixels is NOT a good thing.

    Canon have recently released the S50 and G5, both 5MP versions of previous 4MP cameras. Everything else stays the same, including the physical size of the sensor.

    Putting more pixels in the same size sensor means individual pixels are smaller – this means more amplification is required to take the same photo. This creates MORE NOISE. I would choose the 4MP version over the 5MP version every time due to the higher quality images produces by the 4MP.

    Pixels are only good for final print out size, 4MP is plenty for A4 output.

  • I’m afraid 5 megapixels *is* too good to be true for the Trust 910Z POWERC@M OPTICAL ZOOM. Its specs list a 3.1 megapixel sensor and it makes the rest up by interpolation.
    It’s a similar story with Fujifilm digital cameras. I am sure that Fujifilm cameras are great, but they list a figure called “recorded pixels”, which is different from the number of pixels captured by the CCD (“effective pixels”). This is what the Fujifilm Web site has to say:
    “Recorded Pixels: Represents the number of output, or printable, pixels in a picture that was recorded on the Storage Media after the camera processes the Effective Pixel data from a CCD.”
    In other words, it makes it very difficult for consumers to directly compare cameras from Trust and Fujifilm with others makes, without wading into the specs and having a look.

Comments are closed.