Santok release USB charger for yo' dope wheels (that's car – in street slang)

Those clever little devils at Santok have been up to more cunning in-car japes – this week launching a nifty little in car charger with two 12 volts plugs and two USBs, interesting no?

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The STK may look like the disembodied head of Johnny 5 (can a robot be disembodied? can it even have a head?) but it’s infinitely more uselful. The two 12 volts cigarettelighter-size sockets let you plug in your in-car goodies, your sat-nav and ipod dock, while also charging those USB gadgets that you normaly find tethered to your computer.

The STK has a jointed arm so you can wiggle it into whatever position most fits your wheels’ dash. You could also plug a USB splitter into one of the USB ports, giving you even more USB ports, and then plug another into that one, and another into that one, until your car starts to look like the Dolorian from Back To The Future and you start calling everyone Maaarty. That would be sweet.

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TechDigest writerSantok release USB charger for yo' dope wheels (that's car – in street slang)

British broadband is slow. Very slow.

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If you waited ten seconds or so for this page to load, then you’ll know this already, but your broadband is pretty slow. The Office of National Statistics has revealed that despite Ofcom claiming last year that the average broadband speed in the country is 4.6Mb/sec, more than 42% of connections are less than half that speed – slower than 2Mb/sec.

It turns out that a handful of people using 24Mb/sec services are skewing the stats upward. Worst of all, these figures refer to the advertised ‘headline’ data transfer rates not actual speeds. Statistics for actual speeds would probably be closer to 1Mb/sec, or even lower.

But perhaps it doesn’t even matter. 55% of you have no idea how fast your broadband is, anyway. That said, nearly a fifth of you aren’t happy with it, says a separate report issued by OfCom.

(via PC Pro)

Related posts: Handful of Warrington residents to get 50Mbps Virgin Media broadband | O2 changes mobile broadband based on consumer survey

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Duncan GeereBritish broadband is slow. Very slow.

USB 3.0 spec set in stone – move your files about at speeds of 4.8Gbps

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If you’re constantly shuffling vast Blu-ray rips from device to device and sighing while your PC locks up for 27 minutes, rejoice! USB 3.0 is coming to make all your data-copying woes disappear.

The shadowy USB consortium, which meets in Vienna once every 1000 years, has confirmed the spec of USB 3.0, proudly telling everyone that a 25GB file will copy from a PC to a 3.0 device in 70 seconds…

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Gary CutlackUSB 3.0 spec set in stone – move your files about at speeds of 4.8Gbps

Apple and AT&T sued for selling too many iPhones

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A lawsuit in San Diego, filed last week, is accusing Apple and AT&T of overselling iPhones. It’s being alleged that the companies promised fast 3G speeds, knowing that the thousands of customers would slow down the network to a crawl. The lawsuit also accuses the two companies of misleading customers over the speed of EDGE on the first iPhone…

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Duncan GeereApple and AT&T sued for selling too many iPhones

3 mobile sees traffic rocket sevenfold thanks to USB broadband adaptors

It’s the future. It’s definitely the future. One little USB dongle that’s your broadband connection wherever you go. No hotspot fee rip-offs, no internet separation anxieties, no worries.

And this attainable futuristic dream has resulted in a traffic bonanza for 3, with its newly cheaper USB broadband adaptor making web traffic on its network rocket by seven times in the last six months alone. Here, look, it’s so happy it’s made a graph about it:

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“Sometimes the core network has been running at 102 per cent of capacity, at other times…

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Gary Cutlack3 mobile sees traffic rocket sevenfold thanks to USB broadband adaptors