HOW TO: Watch Premier League football without Sky on a foreign satellite

Gerald Lynch Features, Guides, Satellite TV, Tech Digest news 14 Comments

Football fans and pub owners alike were crossing their fingers and holding their breath in anticipation, following the news that Karen Murphy (landlady of the Red White and Blue in Southsea) stood on the verge of a landmark ruling that…

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3D-ready Toshiba Satellite A665 laptop incoming

Gerald Lynch Laptops / Notebooks, Tech Digest news Leave a Comment

Toshiba have announced the launch of their Satellite A665 laptop, a 3D-ready powerhouse powered by Nvidia's 3D Vision technology. Aimed primarily at gamers and Blu-ray fans, the A665 will have a Quad Core Intel i7 processor under the hood, with…

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UK Satellite TV Comparison Guide: Sky versus Freesat

Andy Merrett Satellite TV 8 Comments

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Two services that require you to stick a satellite dish to the side of your house.

One has been around for two decades, the other has just celebrated its first birthday.

Both will demand an upfront payment: one will continue to drain money from your bank account each month.

So which is best? Read our comparison guide to see if you should go with coming-of-age Sky or new-kid-on-the-block Freesat.

Read on to find out…

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First orbital collision – US and Russian satellites get a little too close

Duncan Geere Space Leave a Comment

In the first reported orbital collision ever, a US and a Russian communications satellite have accidentally collided 780km above Siberia. A “massive cloud of debris” has been produced, and NASA is tracking the hundreds of bits resulting from the crash, in the hope that they won’t interfere with the ISS and the shuttle, which is due to launch later this month.

It’s comprehensively answered the question of “how much stuff can we stick up there without it hitting each other?”, as 6,000 satellites have been sent into orbit since the first in 1957. Only about half are still in use, with the others having become defunct over the years.

The satellites in question belong to Communications firm Iridium, based in Bethesda, Maryland, and Russia’s civilian space agency, Roscosmos. The former was launched in 1997 and only weighed 560kg, so probably came off rather worse in the collision than its one-tonne Russian rival from 1993.

Place your bets in the comments below as to when the second collision will occur. The closest wins a bit of charred satellite, dug out of the tundra of Siberia.

(via BBC)

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Sky offers Sky+HD box for under fifty quid as satellite giant pushes high definition

Andy Merrett HDTV, Satellite TV Leave a Comment

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Sky has decided that it’s time to get really aggressive when it comes to high definition in the UK, and to that end has slashed the price of its Sky+HD box to just £49. That’s a third of the price it was early last year (£150) and is the satellite broadcaster’s hope of getting many more subscribers hooked on pay-for-HD.

In fact, thanks to a lot of enticing marketing and the lure of a variety of sports, films and other content in high definition, Sky has just had its best quarter — in the three months to the end of December, 188,000 people signed up for high-def services, taking the total number of subscribers to nearly 800,000…

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